Licence Categories

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CENTRAL TRANSPORT TRAINING - YOUR FIRST CHOICE FOR DRIVER TRAINING IN THE WEST MIDLANDS. 
CALL 01902 312800
 Driving licences
BOOK WITH CENTRAL TRANSPORT TRAINING TODAY BY  CALLING 01902 312800

LICENCE CATEGORIES

Car licences obtained before 1 January 1997
All drivers who passed a car test before 1 January 1997
retain their existing entitlement to tow trailers until their licence expires. This means they are generally entitled to drive a vehicle and trailer combination up to 8.25 tonnes MAM. They also have entitlement to drive a minibus with a trailer over 750 kgs MAM.

Car licences obtained on or after 1 January 1997
Drivers who passed a car test on or after 1 January 1997 are required to pass an additional driving test in order to gain entitlement to category B+E which allows them to tow caravans and trailers.

Car and trailer practical test
The car and trailer test is based on the lorry driving test and lasts for approximately one hour. Please note that B+E tests are conducted at vocational (bus and lorry) driving test centres.

The towing test (B+E) includes an off-road reverse manoeuvre, a controlled stop, uncoupling and coupling and driving on the road.

You will not be expected to carry out the following exercises:

  • Emergency stop on the public road
  • Reversing round a corner
  • Reverse parking
  • Turning in the road

Safety questions for a car and trailer
Vehicle safety check questions (random checks)

These are basic safety checks that a driver should carry out to ensure the vehicle is safe for use. Although some checks may involve the candidate in opening the bonnet to identify where fluid levels would be checked, pupils will not be asked to touch a hot engine or physically check fluid levels.

As vehicle technology advances, more and more vehicles are being equipped with electronic diagnostic systems, which inform the driver of the state of the engine fluid levels and tyre pressures. It will be acceptable for a candidate to refer to the vehicle information system (if fitted) when answering questions on fluid levels or tyre pressures.

Candidates will be asked five questions, which will be a combination of ‘show me’ and ‘tell me’. A driving fault will be recorded for each incorrect answer to a maximum of four driving faults. If the candidate answers all five questions incorrectly, a serious fault will be recorded.

Drivers who passed a car test on or after 1 January 1997 are required to pass an additional driving test in order to gain this category of licence, however, if you are over 21 the higher licence category C is available to you which will entitle you to drive vehicles over 3500kg.

You will be required to undertake a medical examination to comply with the higher medical regulations that this licence category requires which we can arrange for you. Once you have had your medical you will need to apply for your provisional vocational licence.

Once your licence has been approved and returned to your theory test can be arranged, the theory test is made up of two parts; the multiple-choice part and the hazard perception part. The multiple choice part is delivered using a touch screen computer and mouse and the hazard perception part records your responses through the use of a computer mouse button.

You need to pass both parts to pass the theory test. If you pass one part and fail the other you will fail the whole test, and you will need to take both parts again.

The questions in each multiple choice test vary according to the category of vehicle you are hoping to obtain a licence for, i.e. a motorcycle theory test will contain specific questions that do not appear in any other test.

For the hazard perception test there are no separate versions for different vehicles, each vehicle category takes the same test, however the pass mark is different for different categories of tests.

Part one – Multiple Choice

Before the test starts you will be given instructions on how the test works.

You can also choose to go through a practice session of the multiple-choice questions to get used to the layout of the test. At the end of the practice session the real test will begin.

A question and several answer options will appear onscreen and you have to select the correct answer to the question by touching the screen or using the mouse. Some questions may require more than one answer.

You will be asked 35 questions in 40 minutes.

You can navigate between questions and ‘flag’ questions that you want to come back to later in the test.

The pass mark for the multiple-choice part of the theory test is 30 out of 35.

After the multiple choice part you can choose to have a break of up to three minutes before the hazard perception part starts.

Part two – Hazard Perception

After the break you will then be shown a short tutorial video clip about how the hazard perception part works.

The hazard perception part is also delivered on a computer but you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips that feature every day road scenes. In each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards.

To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development.

The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test; as on the road, you will only have. one chance to respond to the developing hazard. The pass mark for the hazard perception part of the theory test is 50 out of 75.

To become an LGV driver you must possess a high degree of skill in the handling of your vehicle and also be prepared to make allowances for the behaviour of others.

The right attitude and approach to your driving, together with a sound knowledge of professional driving techniques and the ability to apply those techniques, are essential.

You will be required to undertake a medical examination to comply with the higher medical regulations that this licence category requires which we can arrange for you. Once you have had your medical you will need to apply for your provisional vocational licence.

Once your licence has been approved and returned to your theory test can be arranged, the theory test is made up of two parts; the multiple-choice part and the hazard perception part. The multiple choice part is delivered using a touch screen computer and mouse and the hazard perception part records your responses through the use of a computer mouse button.

You need to pass both parts to pass the theory test. If you pass one part and fail the other you will fail the whole test, and you will need to take both parts again.

The questions in each multiple choice test vary according to the category of vehicle you are hoping to obtain a licence for, i.e. a motorcycle theory test will contain specific questions that do not appear in any other test.

For the hazard perception test there are no separate versions for different vehicles, each vehicle category takes the same test, however the pass mark is different for different categories of tests.

Part one – Multiple Choice

Before the test starts you will be given instructions on how the test works.

You can also choose to go through a practice session of the multiple-choice questions to get used to the layout of the test. At the end of the practice session the real test will begin.

A question and several answer options will appear onscreen and you have to select the correct answer to the question by touching the screen or using the mouse. Some questions may require more than one answer.

You will be asked 35 questions in 40 minutes. You can navigate between questions and ‘flag’ questions that you want to come back to later in the test.

The pass mark for the multiple-choice part of the theory test is 30 out of 35.

After the multiple choice part you can choose to have a break of up to three minutes before the hazard perception part starts.

Part two – Hazard Perception

After the break you will then be shown a short tutorial video clip about how the hazard perception part works.

The hazard perception part is also delivered on a computer but you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips that feature every day road scenes. In each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards.

To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development.

The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test; as on the road, you will only have. one chance to respond to the developing hazard. The pass mark for the hazard perception part of the theory test is 50 out of 75.

To obtain this licence you must have first taken the lower category C licence, you will not need to pass a theory test as this would have been done either at Category C1 or Category C stage, if you obtained your category C licence prior to January 1997 then you are also exempt from the theory test.

What will the test include?
You will be examined on your general driving and on set exercises. The set exercises will include:

  • An ‘S’ shaped reverse into a bay
  • A braking exercise
  • Demonstrating the uncoupling and re-coupling procedure if you’re taking a test with a trailer
  • Gear-change exercise
The drive on the road last about 60 minutes and the overall test takes about 90 minutes. During the driving test the examiner will give you directions which you should follow. Test routes are designed to be as uniform as possible and will include a range of typical road and traffic conditions.

Throughout the test you should drive in the way your instructor has taught you. If you make a mistake, don’t worry about it, it might be a less serious driving fault and may not affect your result. The examiner will be looking for an overall safe standard of driving.

You can make up to 15 driving faults and still pass the test (16 or more results in failure). However, if you commit one serious or dangerous fault you will fail the test. If at any time your examiner considers you to be a danger to other road users your test will be stopped.

You are allowed to take someone with you on the test, this person must be over 16 years old and cannot take any part or influence the test.

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